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Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

Read More

Zheravna Festival

Private tours Bulgaria. Bulgaria is no different from any other country in the world. It has its own history, heroes, legends. It surely had its falls and pinnacle. Bulgaria is inviting you on private tours Bulgaria to learn more about the country.

The country had difficult moments but it has always had its folklore. That folklore full of never ending energy which helped Bulgarians to survive through the centuries of wars. It also helped them to stay as a nation. What does folklore mean? It is the beliefs, traditions, stories of a community which are passed through the generations by word of mouth. Bulgarian folk songs, Bulgarian traditional costumes have these in them. The costume is one of the most typical elements of the Bulgarian folk culture.

It reflects the specificity, traditional culture and life of t

Read More

Abandoned part 3

“Is he yours, Kulock? Well, I never!… Look at his little eyes … if he don’t look just like Marina! … her nose—exactly! as I live! What a jewel of a lad!… Give him to me!…” She took the baby from him, and bounced it up and down. “There!… there! you little rascal.”

Old man Kradnick, the “master” of the thieving gentry, got up slowly, approached the baby, examined it, and slapped Kulock on the back.

“Fine husky little chap!… He’ll climb through a transom nimbly enough, all right. … Who’s the mother?”

“May she burn like a fire! … She ran away, taking the candlesticks with her.”

“And left you the kid?”

“Yes.”

“That’s bad… that’s bad.”

The old man scratched his head. The younger Kradnick approached and said to Kulock: “That’s right. … I guess you’ll have to give up the profession now, and become a nurse. &

Read More

Abandoned part 2

He turned away from the child, put on his hat hurriedly, and went out, locking the door behind him. He walked on aimlessly, but with no peace of mind… The baby’s cries kept ringing in his ears, as if it were calling to him… In fancy he could see it before him, kicking its little legs about, wailing frantically… No! he must turn back. …“Oh, if I could get a-hold of her now!” he thought to himself, “I’d nab her by the throat and choke her!… choke her till her tongue stuck out, damn her!”

He entered a bakery, bought a roll, and went back to the house. The baby lay as before, uncovered, but smiling.

Comfortable Enough

“Devil take the brat! he looks comfortable enough, the little cuss.” .. .And he left the house again. But he couldn’t make himself walk on. All the time he fancied he heard the little one wailing… and it made him feel such a gnawing anguish at heart. …

He clenched his fists

Read More

Abandoned part 1

Sholom Asch (1880—1957)

Sholom Asch (or Ash) was born in Poland, and is to-day regarded as one of the most gifted of recent Yiddish writers. He was the writer of plays (The God Of Vengeance was produced in English and censored in New York), novels, and short stories. Like Peretz and certain others, he began writing in Hebrew, but, finding that there was only a small public he could reach by that medium, he soon turned to the Yiddish.

Abandoned is a story characteristic of the nervous style of this writer, brief, highly dramatic, and of compelling interest.

This story is reprinted from the Pagan magazine, the editor of which has authorized its inclusion in the present collection.

Abandoned

When Burih awoke he heard the baby crying, so with eyes still closed he called to his wife: “Golda! the brat is bawling.”

Golda did not answer. He looked around and noticed that she wasn’t in the house. He was rather surprised,

Read More

The Passover Guest part 4

And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we have such a land, ruled over by a Jewish king and high priest, a land with Levites and an organ, with an altar and sacrifices—and bright, sweet thoughts enfold me, and carry me away as on wings to that happy Jewish land where the houses are of pine-wood and roofed with silver, where the furniture is gold, and diamonds and pearls lie scattered in the street.

And I feel sure, were I really there, I should know what to do—I should know how to hide things—they would shake nothing out of me. I should certainly bring home a lovely present for my mother, diamond ear-rings and several pearl necklaces. I look at the one mother is wearing, at her ear-rings, and I feel a great desire to be in that country. And it occurs to me, that after Passover I will travel there with our guest, secretly, no one shall

Read More

The Passover Guest part 3

Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father translated for my mother, giving her a Yiddish version of nearly every phrase. And my mother was quite overcome by every single thing she heard, and Rikel the maid was overcome likewise.

And no wonder! It is not every day that a person comes from perhaps two thousand miles away, from a land only to be reached across seven seas and a desert, the desert journey alone requiring forty days and nights. And when you get near to the land, you have to climb a mountain of which the top reaches into the clouds, and this is covered with ice, and dreadful winds blow there, so that there is peril of death! But once the mountain is safely climbed, and the land is reached, one beholds a terrestrial Eden.

Kind of Fruit

Spices, cloves, herbs, and every kind of fruit—apples, pears, an

Read More

The Passover Guest part 2

Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest hold a Hebrew conversation. I am proud to find that I understand nearly every word of it. Here it is in full.

My father: “Nu?” (That means, “Won’t you please say Kiddush?”) The guest: “Nu-nu!” (meaning, “Say it rather yourself!”)

My father: “Nu-O?” (“Why not you?”)

The guest: “O-nu?” (“Why should I?”)

My father: “I-O!” (“You first!”)

The guest: “O-ai!” (“To« first!”)

My father: “£-o-i!” (“I beg of you to say it!”)

The guest: “Ai-o-e!” (“I beg of you!”)

My father: “Ai-e-o-nu?” (“Why should you refuse?”)

The guest: “Oi-o-e-nu-nu!” (“If you insist, then I must.”)

And the guest took the cup of wine from my father’s hand, and reci

Read More

The Passover Guest part 1

Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)

Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.

The passover guest

Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you becam

Read More

Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose

kazanlak, kazanlak lavender field, holidays to bulgaria, bulgaria holidays to, to holidays bulgaria, lavender garden, lavender kazanlak, kazanlak lavender garden, private tour kazanlak

Holidays Bulgaria – Kazanlak – the town of the most beautiful among women, the rose…

There is something in Kazanlak, which is not only the beautiful nature and the fascinating women. There is something which is in the air, something which is soaked in the soil… Something that explains the specific atmosphere and flavour Kazanlak has. Atmosphere of a place where time stands still but life doesn’t; where one can feel peaceful, calm and safe. And the flavour of the rose, the unique rose.

The Valley of Roses and the Valley of the Thr

Read More

Jugoslavia

The Jugoslavs form a national unit and are
ethnologically part of the Slavonic race. Jugoslav literature begins with
translations of the Bible by Cyril and Methodius, the “Slavonic Apostles,”
about the middle of the Ninth Century. During the first period of the nation’s
literary history, from the Twelfth to the Fifteenth Century, several
biographies and chronicles were produced.

Toward the end of the Fourteenth Century
and until the beginning of the Nineteenth Century the Jugoslavs fell under the
domination of the Turks, who practically arrested national life. There were,
however, those who, despite this catastrophe, tried to carry on the traditions
of their literature.

The deliverance from Turkish rule brought
with it a gradual revival. At first, however, little was written in the
Jugoslav languages (Serbian, Croatian, and Slovenian), because the printing
presses throughout the country had been destroyed by the Turks. The books
imported from Russia were pr

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