August 2019 - Page 3 of 3 - Cappadoica August 2019 - Page 3 of 3 - Cappadoica

Khaled and Djaida part 3

About the same time Moharib, the other brother, had a son born to him, whom he called Khaled. He chose this name out of gratitude to God, because, since his brother’s departure, his affairs had prospered.

The two children in time reached maturity, and their fame spread far and wide among the Arabians. Zahir had taught his daughter to ride horseback, and trained her in all the accomplishments fitting to a brave and daring warrior. He accustomed her to the severest labor, and the most perilous enterprises.

When he went to war, he put her among the other Arabs of the clan, and among these horsemen she soon took her rank as one of the most valiant of them. And thus it came to pass that she outstripped all her comrades, and would even attack the lions in their dens. At last her name inspired the greatest terror; when she had conquered a champion she never failed to cry out: “I am Djonder, son of Zahir, horseman of the clans.”

For his part, her cousin

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Khaled and Djaida part 2

Khaled and Djaida (From The Romance of Antar)

Moharib and Zahir were two brothers, by the same father and mother; the Arabians call them “germane”. Both were eminent for their courage and daring. But Moharib was chief of the clan, and Zahir was his minister, subject to his authority, giving him counsel and advice. It happened that a violent dispute and quarrel arose between them. Zahir retired to his tent, sorrowing and not knowing what to do. “What is the matter with you?” demanded his wife. “Why are you troubled? What has happened? Has anyone displeased or insulted you—the greatest of Arabian chiefs?”

“What am I to do?” said Zahir; “he who has injured me is one I cannot lay hands on, or wrong; my companion in private, my brother in the world. Oh, if it had been any other, I would have shown him what kind of man he was at odds with, and made an example of him before the chiefs of our people!” “Leave him in the enjoyment of his possessi

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Khaled and Djaida part 1

Arabia

Introduction

The literature of the Arab originated in the improvisations of stories and poems among the pre-Mohammedan inhabitants of Arabia. These were the oral recitations of the people, transmitted from generation to generation. It is improbable that anything was actually collected and reduced to writing before the Ninth or Tenth Century A.D., although some time during the Ninth Century Al-Asma’i brought together the elements that make up the Romance of Antar, one of the stories from which is here reprinted. This coloured and romantic accumulation of poetic stories and legends is the great epic of Arabian literature.

The Arabs are noted for nomadic existence, but there were also town dwellers in Arabia who appreciated a less simple story than the recitations of the wandering inhabitants of the desert and therefore im-ported several cycles or collections of tales, of which the supreme masterpiece is the celebrated Thousand Nights and One

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 3

About the same time Moharib, the other brother, had a son born to him, whom he called Khaled. He chose this name out of gratitude to God, because, since his brother’s departure, his affairs had prospered.

The two children in time reached maturity, and their fame spread far and wide among the Arabians. Zahir had taught his daughter to ride horseback, and trained her in all the accomplishments fitting to a brave and daring warrior. He accustomed her to the severest labor, and the most perilous enterprises.

When he went to war, he put her among the other Arabs of the clan, and among these horsemen she soon took her rank as one of the most valiant of them. And thus it came to pass that she outstripped all her comrades, and would even attack the lions in their dens. At last her name inspired the greatest terror; when she had conquered a champion she never failed to cry out: “I am Djonder, son of Zahir, horseman of the clans.”

For his part, her cousin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 2

Khaled and Djaida (From The Romance of Antar)

Moharib and Zahir were two brothers, by the same father and mother; the Arabians call them “germane”. Both were eminent for their courage and daring. But Moharib was chief of the clan, and Zahir was his minister, subject to his authority, giving him counsel and advice. It happened that a violent dispute and quarrel arose between them. Zahir retired to his tent, sorrowing and not knowing what to do. “What is the matter with you?” demanded his wife. “Why are you troubled? What has happened? Has anyone displeased or insulted you—the greatest of Arabian chiefs?”

“What am I to do?” said Zahir; “he who has injured me is one I cannot lay hands on, or wrong; my companion in private, my brother in the world. Oh, if it had been any other, I would have shown him what kind of man he was at odds with, and made an example of him before the chiefs of our people!” “Leave him in the enjoyment of his possessi

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 1

Arabia

Introduction

The literature of the Arab originated in the improvisations of stories and poems among the pre-Mohammedan inhabitants of Arabia. These were the oral recitations of the people, transmitted from generation to generation. It is improbable that anything was actually collected and reduced to writing before the Ninth or Tenth Century A.D., although some time during the Ninth Century Al-Asma’i brought together the elements that make up the Romance of Antar, one of the stories from which is here reprinted. This coloured and romantic accumulation of poetic stories and legends is the great epic of Arabian literature.

The Arabs are noted for nomadic existence, but there were also town dwellers in Arabia who appreciated a less simple story than the recitations of the wandering inhabitants of the desert and therefore im-ported several cycles or collections of tales, of which the supreme masterpiece is the celebrated Thousand Nights and One

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 3

About the same time Moharib, the other brother, had a son born to him, whom he called Khaled. He chose this name out of gratitude to God, because, since his brother’s departure, his affairs had prospered.

The two children in time reached maturity, and their fame spread far and wide among the Arabians. Zahir had taught his daughter to ride horseback, and trained her in all the accomplishments fitting to a brave and daring warrior. He accustomed her to the severest labor, and the most perilous enterprises.

When he went to war, he put her among the other Arabs of the clan, and among these horsemen she soon took her rank as one of the most valiant of them. And thus it came to pass that she outstripped all her comrades, and would even attack the lions in their dens. At last her name inspired the greatest terror; when she had conquered a champion she never failed to cry out: “I am Djonder, son of Zahir, horseman of the clans.”

For his part, her cousin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 2

Khaled and Djaida (From The Romance of Antar)

Moharib and Zahir were two brothers, by the same father and mother; the Arabians call them “germane”. Both were eminent for their courage and daring. But Moharib was chief of the clan, and Zahir was his minister, subject to his authority, giving him counsel and advice. It happened that a violent dispute and quarrel arose between them. Zahir retired to his tent, sorrowing and not knowing what to do. “What is the matter with you?” demanded his wife. “Why are you troubled? What has happened? Has anyone displeased or insulted you—the greatest of Arabian chiefs?”

“What am I to do?” said Zahir; “he who has injured me is one I cannot lay hands on, or wrong; my companion in private, my brother in the world. Oh, if it had been any other, I would have shown him what kind of man he was at odds with, and made an example of him before the chiefs of our people!” “Leave him in the enjoyment of his possessi

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 1

Arabia

Introduction

The literature of the Arab originated in the improvisations of stories and poems among the pre-Mohammedan inhabitants of Arabia. These were the oral recitations of the people, transmitted from generation to generation. It is improbable that anything was actually collected and reduced to writing before the Ninth or Tenth Century A.D., although some time during the Ninth Century Al-Asma’i brought together the elements that make up the Romance of Antar, one of the stories from which is here reprinted. This coloured and romantic accumulation of poetic stories and legends is the great epic of Arabian literature.

The Arabs are noted for nomadic existence, but there were also town dwellers in Arabia who appreciated a less simple story than the recitations of the wandering inhabitants of the desert and therefore im-ported several cycles or collections of tales, of which the supreme masterpiece is the celebrated Thousand Nights and One

Read More