August 2019 - Page 2 of 3 - Cappadoica August 2019 - Page 2 of 3 - Cappadoica

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More

The Pier part 3

Peeping into the room she finds two beds, under which the familiar packages and trunks are deposited. Her husband is standing before one of the beds.

“Look it through, madam. It is like this.”

This is the room; she must look through it carefully. During the long, long voyage of her husband, this is the room where her dreams must come and go.

A man, who looks like the captain, comes, and, addressing her husband in French, guides him to the saloon of the ship. She follows her husband and the viscount and enters the romp.

This is a spacious and beautiful saloon. Several tables are arranged, each bearing a flower basket. … Gradually the people who came to say farewell gather into the room.

By the order of this man, who looks like the captain, a waiter brings forth many cups in the shape of morning-glories, and, pouring champagne into them, he distributes them among the people. Another waiter brings cakes, like those which are b

Read More

The Pier part 2

While walking slowly, she sees her husband and the viscount, his companion, crossing the gangplank and entering the ship.

The group of people looking after them are standing, here and there, on the pier. Almost all of them are those who came to bid adieu to her husband and the viscount. Perhaps there are no other passengers on this ship about to sail who are so important and are looked at by so many people.

Some of them are going to the foot of the stool on which the gangplank is laid, and stop there to wait for their companions. Some of them are standing at the place, a bit before the stool, where the blocks and ropes are laid down.

Among these people there must be some who are intimately known to her husband, and some who know him but slightly. But, standing under this clear sky, they all seem dejected; or is it only her fancy?

Following slowly after them, unconsciously she looks off to her right where there were many round windows on the si

Read More

The Pier part 1

Mori Ogwai (1860—1932)

Mori Ogwai, who was at one time army surgeon general, was one of the most distinguished Japanese literary men. He has been indefatigable in his labors of translation and interpretation.

His versions of the great works of European writers are considered among the finest in all modern Japanese literature. He also wrote important biographies, novels, and many excellent short stories.

This story, translated by Torao Taketomo, is reprinted from the volume Paulownia, copyright, 1918, by Duffield & Co., New York, by permission of the publisher.

The Pier

The rails of four railroads cut straight and obliquely the beams of the iron bridge on which the long and short cross-beams are like the bars of a mylophone on which children play. Through the cracks of the cross-beams, that almost catch the heels of shoes and wooden clogs, here and there the black waves are shown, reflected on the white flashes of sunshine.

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 10

Khaled was determined at once to resist her in this demand. They engaged in a furious combat. The struggle lasted for well oyer an hour, when the warrior saw in the eyes of his adversary an expression which frightened him. He mounted his horse again, and having wheeled round his steed from the place of combat, exclaimed: “By the faith of an Arab, I beg of you to tell me what horseman of the desert you are; for I feel that your attack and the violence of your blows are irresistible.

You have prevented me from accomplishing what I had intended, and everything that I had eagerly wished to do.” On hearing these words Djaida raised her visor, allowing him to see her face. “Khaled,” she cried, “is it necessary for the girl you love to attack wild beasts, in order that the daughters of Arabia may learn that this is not the sole privilege of a warrior?” At this stinging rebuke Khaled was overcome with shame.

By the faith of an Arab

“By the faith

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 9

This is my demand: that on the day of my marriage, some nobleman’s daughter, a free-born woman, hold the bridle of my camel; she ipust be the daughter of a prince of the highest rank, in order that I may be most honored of all the daughters of Arabia.” Khaled consented, and set about to carry out her wishes.

That same day he started with his horsemen, and crossed plains and valleys, searching the land of Ymer, until he reached the country of Hijar and the hills of Sand. In that place he attacked the tribe-family of Moawich, son of Mizal. He fell upon them like a tempest, and cutting a way with his sword through the opposing horsemen, took prisoner Amima, daughter of Moawich, at the very moment when she was betaking herself to flight.

Having accomplished feats which rendered useless the resistance of the skilful heroes, after having scattered all the clans in flight, and car-ried off all the wealth of all the Arabs in that country, he returned home. But he di

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 8

Khaled began by complimenting his uncle on his fortunate return from war, but no one could be more astounded than Zahir at this second visit, particularly when he saw his nephew with all the chieftains of his family. It never occurred to him that his daughter Djaida had anything to do with Khaled’s return; he thought that his nephew simply wished to persuade him to return to his native land.

He offered them every hospitality, provided them with tents and entertained them in great magnificence. He ordered camels and sheep killed, and offered a banquet, furnishing his guests with all things needful and proper for a period of three days. On the fourth day Khaled arose, and after thanking his uncle for all his courtesy, asked him for his daughter’s hand, and begged him to return to his own land.

Zahir denied that he had any child except his son Djonder, but Khaled told him all that he had learned, and all that had passed between himself and Djaida. On hearing t

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 7

She thereupon mounted her camel at once, and started off through the desert on the tracks of Djaida, who immediately on her arrival home had told her mother everything that had happened. As soon as Khaled’s mother had arrived, she threw herself into the arms of her relative and demanded Djaida in marriage for her son, for Zahir had not yet returned from his expedition.

When Djaida heard from her mother the request of Khaled, she said, “This shall never be, even though I be forced to drink the cup of death. What occurred at his tents was brought about by me to quench the fire of my grief and unhappi-ness, and soothe the anguish of my soul.”

On hearing these words Khaled’s mother, disappointed, went back to her son, who was tortured by the crudest anxiety. He rose suddenly to his feet, for his love had reached the point of despair, and asked un-easily what were the feelings of his cousin. When he learned the answer of Djaida his distress became overwhelmin

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 6

When they separated neither one was hurt, and none could say which was the victor. Thus Djaida, while rousing the admiration of the spectators, perceived the annoyance they felt on finding their chief equaled in fight by so skilful an opponent.

Khaled ordered his antagonist to be treated with every care and honor, and then retired to his tent, his mind filled with thoughts of this conflict. Djaida remained for three days at her cousin’s dwelling-place. Every morning she presented herself on the field of combat and remained under arms until the fall of night. She enjoyed it greatly, still keeping her identity concealed, whilst Khaled, on the other hand, made no inquiries, and asked no questions of her, as to who she was and to what clan she might belong.

On the morning of the fourth day, while Khaled, according to his custom, rode out over the plain, and passed close to the tents reserved for strangers, he caught sight of Djaida mounting her horse. He saluted h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 5

On hearing these words Khaled cast his eyes on the ground; and remained for some time thoughtful and gloomy. Then he answered: “Mother, I cannot remain here longer. I must return home in company with my horsemen and troops. I have no intention of saying more to my cousin; I am convinced that she is a girl whose temper and philosophy are uncertain; her character and mode of speech are destitute of stability and propriety. I have always been accustomed to live with warriors, on whom I spend my wealth, and with whom I win a soldier’s fame. As for my cousin’s love for me, it is the weakness of a woman, a young girl.”

He then put on his armor, mounted his horse, bade his uncle farewell, and announced his intention of leaving on the moment. “What means this haste?” cried Zahir. “I can remain here no longer,” answered Khaled, and, putting his horse to a gallop, he plunged into the wilderness. His mother, after relating to Djaida the conversation she had had with h

Read More

Khaled and Djaida part 4

As for his cousin, the moment she had seen how handsome and valiant Khaled was, she fell violently in love with him. She was unable to sleep; she could not eat; and her love drew to such a pitch that feeling her heart completely lost to him, she spoke to her mother, saying: “Oh, mother, if my cousin should leave without taking me with him, I shall die of grief at his absence.”

Then her mother was touched with pity for her, and spoke no reproaches, feeling that they would be in vain. “Djaida,” she said, “conceal your feelings, and restrain yourself from grief. You have done nothing wrong, for your cousin is the man of your choice, and is of your own race and blood. Like him, you are beautiful and attractive; like him, brave and skilful in horsemanship. Tomorrow morning, when his mother comes to us, I will lay before her the whole matter; we will soon afterwards give you to him in marriage, and at last we shall all return to our own country.”

Zahir’s

Read More