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Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More

Two Worlds part 2

The bell began to toll in the small village church.

She turned from the sunset, and rocked her head to and fro, as if she sought to escape the sound of the bells, while she mumbled almost as an answer to the continuous ringing:

“I cannot wait. I cannot wait.”

But the sound continued.

As if in pain, she walked back and forth on the veranda. The shadows of despair had grown deeper, and she drew her breath heavily, like one who is forced to tears and cannot cry.

In long, long years she had suffered from a painful malady which never let her rest, whether lying down or walking. She had consulted one “wise” woman after another. She had dragged herself from one “holy” spring to another, but without avail. Finally she had gone on the September pilgrimage to St. Bartholomew; and here an old one- eyed man had advised her to tie together a bouquet of edelweiss and a splinter of glass, a huck of corn, and some ferns from a graveyard,

Read More

Two Worlds part 1

Jens Peter Jacobsen (1847-1885)

Jacobsen, who began writing under the influence of Hans Christian Andersen, soon developed into a novelist and short story writer of great originality. Though he was as deeply interested in natural science as in literature, during the course of his short life he was influential chiefly as a writer.

Two Worlds is. typical of his poetic turn of mind, and reveals his technical skill as a story-teller. It is translated by H. Knudsen, first appeared in the Pagan magazine, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Two Worlds

The Salzach is not a merry river. On its eastern bank lies a little village, very gloomy, very poor, and strangely quiet.

Like a miserable flock of misshapen beggars who have been stopped by the river, without fare for the ferryman, stand the houses down there on the uttermost edge of the bank, their decayed shoulders leaning against each other, and grope hopelessly with the

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 7

The head of the household was absent on a hunting party. He may not have been a very interesting man, but even a less entertaining person to whom one is accustomed, may by his absence leave a hole, an emptiness, which it is difficult to fill, especially in the country where the postman is not expected for another day or two, or where the farmhand has returned from his last trip to town with the wrong books from the circulating library or perhaps with no books at all.

Fortunately Lundtofte had its own library. After impatiently putting aside her embroidery, the young girl fetched a copy of Oehlenschlager`s poems, and at the request of the older lady began reading aloud. It was the romance about Aage and Else. Before she had reached the end, she suddenly stopped, exclaiming, “I wonder how these legends arise, about lovers who step forth from their graves? I am sure they are not taken from real life.”

Conversation to the subject

The old lady`s re

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 6

He deliberated for a moment, trying to find his bearings, and as he considered carefully everything that had happened, he remembered suddenly that the farmer had not put him out by the front gate; he realized therefore that he had taken the wrong course and would have to go back almost as far as he had come. He did not want to pass the farm once more; and besides, he figured out that as the farm must be on his right hand and the town south of the farmstead, he would have to keep in a straight line toward the southeast.

But the heath cannot be traversed by means of guesswork, and after a short time he absolutely lost his way among the heather, wet to the skin and surrounded by utter darkness.

The situation began indeed to seem perilous, and not without reason. The indisposition he had felt earlier in the day had increased. The blood hammered in his temples, and his head was hot and pained him considerably. His clothes were soaking wet, and he shivered with cold.

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 5

“Is that so!” said the farmer.

“Yes, that is so. And now let me get back to town immediately.”

“Go ahead,” replied the farmer. “Nobody is holding you back, neither you nor your foul words. You had better take them along with you.”

“It just occurs to me,” said the doctor, in a milder tone, “that there may be a misunderstanding somewhere. I moved into the house of Hansen, the veterinary, so that may explain the case.”

“May be,” answered the farmer.

“Will you please send the wagon for me?”

“No, our horses shall not drive you or your ugly words from this place—not unless you cure the pig first.”

“Don`t talk to me about your confounded pig.”

Without another word the farmer took hold of the doctor so’ it hurt, pressing the latter`s arms tightly up against his sides just above the hips, and by lifting him a little from the ground brought him into an almost hor

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 4

One day, not long afterwards, a man from the neighboring country drove up in front of the house and asked the doctor to follow him to his master`s farm. Falk was pleased that the news of his establishment had already reached the farmers in the district; his new, hitherto unused doctor`s stool was soon placed in the wagon, and the two drove off in silence.

After they got out of the town Falk asked the sullen driver, “What is the matter with your patient? What do you think has gone wrong?”

“He got a bone in his throat,” replied the man.

“I see! Did you not try to slap him on the back?”

The man turned slowly toward the doctor, looked puzzled at him and said, “Very likely.”

There the conversation ended, and after a while they arrived at the farm, which was situated at the edge, or almost at the edge of the heath. The farmer received the doctor, showed him the way to the parlor and sent for sandwiches and brandy, but F

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 3

And now it was all over! For among the qualities which heretofore he had hardly noticed or appreciated in her, one trait now seemed to stand out: she was determined and high-minded. It was due to her ideality and womanly loftiness, and to her lack of coquetry that she had immediately accepted him, and this romance he had dragged into mere prose and thereby become extremely unhappy himself.

For some time he grieved very much and, although his sorrow became less intense as time passed, it remained in his heart and made a great change in him.

To begin with, he gave up the study of theology. This desire had been as sudden as his engagement. He had discussed with Rosalie country life, parsonages, happiness, and before he knew it this had led him to speak the decisive word; later he had had a feeling that the way in which he had spoken contained a promise that he would lead her into his parsonage.

This was the reason why he chose the study of theology. But n

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 2

“You know,” continued Rosalie`s aunt. “I had really no control over her plans. She was here only on a visit and if she wanted to go to the— to other relatives of hers, I had no means of preventing her.”

Which relatives, which uncle and aunt—for Rosalie`s parents were dead—the lady would not tell; she said she had given her word of honor not to disclose the secret. They discussed the matter for some time, and in the course of the conversation Rosalie`s aunt asked Henrik if he was certain that he had not in any way offended the young girl, of which he assured her most emphatically.

“Oh, well,” said the aunt, “it is a difficult problem to handle such a young girl, only seventeen years of age, besides being of independent means. You know, Mr. Falk, she was really too young to become engaged. Next time you must be more cautious.”

Less appreciative

On his way home, and for several hours after, Henrik reviewed carefully

Read More

Henrik and Rosalie part 1

Meyer Aron Goldschmidt (1819-1887)

Goldschmidt was for the greater part of his life actively engaged in editorial work. As editor of a satirical and political paper he threw himself whole-heartedly into the struggle for the establishment of liberal ideas. As a writer he excelled in his novels and tales of Jewish life. He is regarded as a great stylist, and in his typical novels and short stories he shows a firm grasp of character.

Henrik and Rosalie is considered one of his finest stories. It was originally published in His Love Stories of Many Lands, in 1867. The present version is translated by Minna Wreschner. It appeared in The American Scandinavian Review, July, 1922, and is here reprinted by permission of the editor.

Henrik and Rosalie

The fate that rules in matters of love is often singular, and its ways are inscrutable, not only in vital things but also in those of less importance, as this story will show.

Henrik Falk, st

Read More

Kukeri Carnival

Visit Bulgaria and become part of the different world of the Kukeri Carnival

Kukeri Carnival – The boundless magic called Kukeri Carnival!

Among the most colourful customs in the Bulgarian Calendar of traditions are the Kukeri Games. When you travel to Bulgaria (private Sofia tour) you will see for yourselves that people preserved the custom with its whole pagan power. Although the custom bears the peculiar characteristics of each different region, as a whole, the ceremonies and rituals are pretty much the same. Once you’ve been part of the spectacular scenario of folk theatre, kukeri games, you will come back again and again. For the sound of the cow-bells called `chan` that starts early in the morning cannot be mistaken; as well as the scary, hairy masks and crazy costumes and the people wearing them jumping around.

Travel to

Read More