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The Passover Guest – Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)
Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his contemporaries, he excels in the description of the pathos and tragedy of his people, though he was frequently able, as in ‘The Passover Guest, to turn a tragic theme into a richly comic one.

The passover guest is quaintly humorous, though at the same time a bitter commentary on life. It is the artist’s way of describing the lot of the Jew in the modern world.

The Passover Guest – This story is reprinted from the volume, Yiddish Tales, translated by Helena Frank, copyright, 1912, by the Jewish Publication Society of America, by whose permission and that of the Sholom Aleichem Foundation it is here reprinted.
The passover guest
Uthave a Passover guest for you, Reb Yoneh, such a guest as you A never had since you became a householder.”

“What sort is he?”

“A real Oriental citron!”

“What does that mean?”

“It means a ‘silken Jew,’ a personage of distinction. The only thing against him is—he doesn’t speak our language.”

“What does he speak, then?”

“Hebrew.”

“Is he from Jerusalem?”

“I don’t know where he comes from, but his words are full of a’s.” Such was the conversation that took place between my father and the beadle, a day before Passover, and I was wild with curiosity to see the “guest” who didn’t understand Yiddish, and who talked with a’s. I had already noticed, in synagogue, a strange-looking individual, in a fur cap, and a Turkish robe striped blue, red, and yellow.

We boys crowded round him on all sides, and stared, and then caught it hot from the beadle, who said children had no business “to creep into a stranger’s face” like that. Prayers over, every one greeted the stranger, and wished him a happy Passover, and he, with a sweet smile on his red cheeks set in a round gray beard, replied to each one, “Shalom! Shalom!” instead of our Sholom. This “Shalom! Shalom!” of his sent us boys into fits of laughter. The beadle grew very angry, and pursued us with slaps. We eluded him, and stole deviously back to the stranger, listened to his “Shalom! Shalom!” exploded with laughter, and escaped anew from the hands of the beadle.

The Passover Guest part 4

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And with these words my father sighs deeply, and my mother, as she looks at him, sighs also, and I cannot understand the reason. Surely we should be proud and glad to think we...

The Passover Guest part 3

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Having learned his name, my father was anxious to know whence, from what land he came. I understood this from the names of countries and towns which I caught, and from what my father...

The Passover Guest part 2

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Mother is taken up with the preparations for the Passover meal, and Rikel the maid is helping her. It is only when the time comes for saying Kiddush that my father and the guest...

The Passover Guest part 1

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Sholom Aleichem (Sholorn Rabinovitch) (1859-1916)Rabinovitch, known everywhere by his pseudonym, Sholom Aleichem, was born in Russia. He is one of the most beloved figures in all Yiddish literature. In common with nearly all his...

Foltyn`s Drum part 8

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